lawrenceleemagnuson:


Tom Wesselmann, USA 1931-2004   Helen Nude 1981    screenprint in colours on wove paper 90.8 x 93.3 cm

lawrenceleemagnuson:

Tom Wesselmann, USA 1931-2004   Helen Nude 1981    screenprint in colours on wove paper 90.8 x 93.3 cm

16 Sep 2014 / Reblogged from repo-thedj with 684 notes

poplatch:

Aesthetics 

16 Sep 2014 / Reblogged from danburyshakes with 646 notes

sighkingu:

ヘルメス・ラヂオHermes Radio Advertisement 1936
[Via 昭和モダン好き]

sighkingu:

ヘルメス・ラヂオ
Hermes Radio Advertisement 1936

[Via 昭和モダン好き]

12 Sep 2014 / Reblogged from sound-anatomia with 80 notes

jesuisperdu:

studio takeuma

jesuisperdu:

studio takeuma

12 Sep 2014 / Reblogged from greatworkgoodjob with 414 notes


Ottoman textile

Ottoman textile

(Source: sophiarogersimages)

11 Sep 2014 / Reblogged from vulturus with 1,487 notes

emmacooper:

Kustaa Saksi

emmacooper:

Kustaa Saksi

11 Sep 2014 / Reblogged from pomegranate-poet with 758 notes

suzani:

Tajik wedding face veil with heavily embroidered front, 19th c. Central Asia.

suzani:

Tajik wedding face veil with heavily embroidered front, 19th c. Central Asia.

(Source: pinterest.com)

11 Sep 2014 / Reblogged from itsverypoetry with 32 notes

pizzzatime:

damiencorrell: Can’t See Anything Rug (detail)

pizzzatime:

damiencorrell: Can’t See Anything Rug (detail)

11 Sep 2014 / Reblogged from danburyshakes with 4,969 notes

philamuseum:

Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959) designed over 1000 buildings in his lifetime, and often designed all of the interior features from the furniture to the curtains. One such example is this stained glass window made for the Darwin D. Martin House in Buffalo, New York.
Casement Window, Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, 1903-5. Made by Linden Glass Company, Chicago, 1882 - 1934. Leaded glass; metal frame, 21 1/2 x 11 5/8 x 3/4 inches (54.6 x 29.5 x 1.9 cm), © Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, 1968-170-1. Purchased with the Director’s Discretionary Fund, 1968

philamuseum:

Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959) designed over 1000 buildings in his lifetime, and often designed all of the interior features from the furniture to the curtains. One such example is this stained glass window made for the Darwin D. Martin House in Buffalo, New York.

Casement Window, Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, 1903-5. Made by Linden Glass Company, Chicago, 1882 - 1934. Leaded glass; metal frame, 21 1/2 x 11 5/8 x 3/4 inches (54.6 x 29.5 x 1.9 cm), © Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, 1968-170-1. Purchased with the Director’s Discretionary Fund, 1968

11 Sep 2014 / Reblogged from danburyshakes with 435 notes

likeafieldmouse:

Laura Plageman - In-between Places (2005-8)

11 Sep 2014 / Reblogged from xgrayvision with 2,346 notes

andrewfishman:

Guillermo Vargas, “Exposición N° 1”, 2007
One of the most powerful and thought-provoking pieces of modern art I’ve heard of in years. The popular (but inaccurate) story goes that Guillermo Vargas, for his 2007 exhibit ”Exposición N° 1,” chained a dog to the wall and starved it until it died in the gallery.  
The real story is much more likely what Vargas has stated, that it the dog was, in fact, fed regularly and escaped after only three hours.  He did, however, intend for people not to know the true condition of the dog.  The exhibit received an enormous backlash from the community, and the internet lit up against the published photos. This was part of the intended reaction, because it then allowed Vargas to respond…pointing out that they would not have cared if the dog were starving even fifty feet from the gallery.  
It is very similar to Kiyoshi Kuromiya’s 1968 viral protest against the use of napalm in the Vietnam War, in which he announced that a dog would be burned alive in front of the University of Pennsylvania’s library.  When thousands showed up to protest, they found only a note reading “Congratulations on your anti-napalm protest. You saved the life of a dog. Now, how about saving the lives of tens of thousands of people in Vietnam.”  

andrewfishman:

Guillermo Vargas, “Exposición N° 1”, 2007

One of the most powerful and thought-provoking pieces of modern art I’ve heard of in years. The popular (but inaccurate) story goes that Guillermo Vargas, for his 2007 exhibit ”Exposición N° 1,” chained a dog to the wall and starved it until it died in the gallery.  

The real story is much more likely what Vargas has stated, that it the dog was, in fact, fed regularly and escaped after only three hours.  He did, however, intend for people not to know the true condition of the dog.  The exhibit received an enormous backlash from the community, and the internet lit up against the published photos. This was part of the intended reaction, because it then allowed Vargas to respond…pointing out that they would not have cared if the dog were starving even fifty feet from the gallery.  

It is very similar to Kiyoshi Kuromiya’s 1968 viral protest against the use of napalm in the Vietnam War, in which he announced that a dog would be burned alive in front of the University of Pennsylvania’s library.  When thousands showed up to protest, they found only a note reading “Congratulations on your anti-napalm protest. You saved the life of a dog. Now, how about saving the lives of tens of thousands of people in Vietnam.”  

10 Sep 2014 / Reblogged from animal-chain with 222 notes


Reading a stranger’s diary from the 1970s

Reading a stranger’s diary from the 1970s

(Source: yelibun)

10 Sep 2014 / Reblogged from 1109-83 with 53,119 notes

10 Sep 2014 / Reblogged from kingofpiss with 3 notes

gurafiku:

Japanese Event Flyer: This Week. Motoi Shito. 2014

gurafiku:

Japanese Event Flyer: This Week. Motoi Shito. 2014

(Source: motoishito)

9 Sep 2014 / Reblogged from wiggzzzzzz with 250 notes

tierradentro:

“Growth of the Night Plants”, 1922, Paul Klee.

tierradentro:

Growth of the Night Plants”, 1922, Paul Klee.

9 Sep 2014 / Reblogged from wiggzzzzzz with 628 notes